Masterpiece Landscaping Blog

March 20, 2017

The Rabbit Problem

Filed under: Bulbs,garden seasons,Pruning,shrubs and trees — glenn @ 10:21 pm

I have made myself wander through our gardened grounds here in Minnetonka where I have lived since January 1, 1974.   Walking through and cleaning up the grounds isn’t as easy as it used to be.  I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg late last November.   That plus my elderly condition in general has delayed service in my keeping the grounds beautiful…..

……especially when I wasn’t around to keep deer and rabbits “in their place”.  They must have thought I went somewhere South for the winter instead of being crippled indoors.

Most of you home owners cover your grounds almost entirely with grass.   My gardened grounds has to be a bit more than a half acre upon which I have only a five minute mowing patch of  lawn…..all of it quite mediocre.

I did apply Milorganite as recommended in our previous article this past February.  Most of the damage had already been done.

Rabbits love arborvitae, at least those which have foliage reaching the ground.  Yet, not all arborvitae are equally pleasing to these pesty rodents.  Those shrubby with yellowish foliage seem to be breakfast, lunch, and Sunday dinner unless protection is provided.   Don’t worry about  the tree forms once they have reached adolescence….about ten feet tall…..There after the bark is too ‘barky’ for rabbit food.   In a few years after adolescence, however, when the arborvitae tree bark is about a foot or  more in diameter at your waistline, you can expect male deer activity in October and November to shred it into ribbons with its antlers while hunting down some doe to do their nature together.

Fortunately only females jumped my fencing during my recovery……some eatings, lots of poop dropped, but no scars on any of my countless trees from antlers.

This is the best time for pruning the lower branches made nude of foliage by rabbits.  All you have to do is observe the ugly damage usually below  the first foot or three above the ground, depending upon the  snow  depth of the past winter.   Use a professional felco hand sheers for smaller woody cuts or a quality Japanese hand saw, but not the low quality stuff you usually see being sold at your local monster store.   Use your eye as your art scope ready to make your eaten shrub beautiful….not necessarily for the moment, but for its future.

Remember, the conifers Pine, Spruce, and Fir are not pruned as if they are arborvitae, chamaecyparis,   juniper or yew.   Pine, Spruce, and Fir develop candle-like foliage clusters rather than a mass of  new foliage of greenery, foliage which can easily be sheered if needed.

If you  want  to artistically , or need  to prune back any of these new  Spring-developing Pine, Spruce, or Fir candles, prune back only the fresh candles, but never previous years’  candles.   Remember that the previous year’s  foliage is not able to produce new buds on the old wood of  these particular  shrubs or trees.

Note:  My  snow drops opened bloom last Saturday.   The rabbits have probably destroyed nearly all of my Crocus…but the Chionodoxa and Narcissus will begin blooming in April.

Do not forget, all Narcissus produce a chemical which makes them uneatable for the animal world.

February 3, 2017

The Beauty of the Fragrance of Human Manure In the Landscape Garden

Winter is rarely  a kind season for most of our landscape gardens and their gardeners  here in Minnesota.   Winds,  killer  evening temperatures,  crushing snow layers, sunburns on bark, deer, dogs,  and then there are the rabbits.

Sixty years of rumor have told me   rabbits are hit with a vicious virus or two about every seven years which wipes out the vast majority of a settled rabbit population…,.I used to believe the rumor….until reviewing the last five to seven years of rabbits running around winter in my gardened grounds.

Last year rabbits caused more  damage in my grounds  and others our Masterpiece Landscaping company  has created,  was the worst in a decade or more.   Arborvitae shrubs chewed to pieces to the one foot high mark….some  chewings even  higher where plant foliage and snowdrifts meet.  Many of my plants’  rabbits came from neighbors’ habitats and nearby woods.   I laid out some wire fencing in areas where my  most valuable cherished plants are located.   Some young woodies disappeared entirely into rabbit poop over a single night.

There is a “friend” available at most garden centers and hardware stores you might want to meet for assistance in reducing your landscaped grounds rabbit population….It’s usually  sold in about a 25 pound bag….with the name MILORGANITE  printed on it.

Again…MILORGANITE…and it has been around these northern areas for decades, and available in eastern Wisconsin for many, many decades more.   Milwaukee is where these bags originated.  One can tell by its name…”Milwaukee organic matter”…and it used to be  found very close to home in the old days.  It may still be ‘organized’ exclusively in Milwaukee, for  the organic matter it sells originates from Milwaukee area human poop…..aged to perfection, of course!

If your garden plants have been  pestered by rabbits this  winter,  you might want to try  Milorganite  for temporary rabbit control.   It consists of countless  tiny pellets of human organic waste and is sold as a slow release garden fertilizer.   But, this fertilizer  carries an odor, which of course, doesn’t bother any plants at all…..nor does it bother Mr. or Mrs. Gardeners.   It seems to bother rabbits of all shapes and sizes for a while.

It can be spread broadly around the garden area or around any  plants at any time for normal garden soil and plant enrichment.

Before snowfall, rabbits usually have an endless supply of herbs to eat up.   After snowfall most of that rabbit food becomes unavailable forcing a change in the bunny diet….conifer foliage and bark…..young deciduous tree and shrub bark now appear on top of  the rabbit diet.

So, whenever you are in the mood to fertilize your  trees and shrubs after snowfall, you might want to think of human manure from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.    I usually wait until after the first major snowfall before I apply this unusual fertilizer.    Whatever power Milorganite has over rabbits, it weakens when its pellets are  lying under every major snowfall, so  keep that in mind.

Spread it by hand in  glove.   Throw handfuls of this “aromatic” fertilizer around the crowns of   shrubs and young tree trunks, bunnies usually  nest or chew on.   Rose shrubs, those beautiful new hybrids available to northern gardeners these days, are usually breakfast, lunch, and supper desserts  to rabbits of all ages.  Winged Euonymus bark near soil level can be ravaged by a bunny or two in a week.  Canadian plum trees of all varieties when  can be chewed to pieces by deer or rabbits  in winter or anytime if there is no protection such as tree wrap around the structural stems.

Don’t be wussy about the amount of Milwaukee manure you throw around the trunks of your susceptible cherished plants.   Toss  to ten or even  more handfuls, around each trunk  of the susceptible plants you cherish more than your  rabbits do…..ideally, each time after a heavy snowfall.   Good Luck.

Be sure to call us at Masterpiece Landscaping at 952-933-5777 when you need help creating and maintaining beauty on your home or business grounds.

 

November 17, 2016

2016….The Most Beautiful Autumn of My Conscious Life

About six weeks ago I had planned in mind, but not on paper or computer, what a landscape garden expert…me….should share to you, the vast landscape garden  unaware of the great outdoors around you before snowfall.

I had in mind a written lecture NEVER to almost  never, mine the grounds you own by throwing away its leaves, for leaves should be recycled rather than burned or sent to garbage…..I planned to suggest tricks of my trade from learnings I have been blessed to absorb during the 42 years I have developed the magnificent grounds in which I live.

I am a Milorganite user kind of guy…The past hour  I was applying ‘sweet-smelling Milorganite bits around the plantings of my domain this very day, for I got wind that tomorrow snow will bring winter, and the snowfall might become  considerable by wet and inch.   About twenty minutes into the labor, I remember that about a month ago, before snowfall, I should share with readers the benefit I have discovered from applying Milorganite in the landscape garden ever Autumn just before snowfall.

A lot of good it will do at this point a day before the deluge…..and I have to hurry for I have a business appointment to attend within 30 minutes…..What I should have written a month ago, beyond saving the leaves every Autumn is the following tidbits about Milorganite.

It comes from Milwaukee human poop, but is sold in pellets, very small ones.   It is a slow, quite slow, nutrient release fertilizer, relatively high in Nitrogen, a touch of Phosphorus, and no Potassium.    Those who visit these garden grounds I maintain, are always admiring the ’tilth’ feel of foot when browsing through its beauty and are shocked at the size and richness of color of my conifers….Well, some if the feel comes from moles playing submarine under each garden path, but the size, color, and their wealth of health is universal in the territory.

To “wit”, I planted ten second year old White Pines in 1976 as essential structural forms for the grounds, but most of all in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.   For your view each of the ten were about ten inches long…including root.

Three of them these forty years later are crowding or exceed their 100th foot mark…..and are gorgeous specimens.

Fall leaves and Milorganite have kept them healthy….for THERE IS NO DECAY WITHOUT LIFE….and the decay, autumn leaves and Milwaukee human poop have been, in my experience, essential in the health of these and dozens and dozens of other trees on my property….most ot them conifers…..(Winter in Minnesota  is long, folks, very long,    I have to run to attend a client….

But, don’t forget….rabbits don’t like the smell of human excrement, the major ingredient in Milorganite….

 

October 26, 2016

The Wisp of Winter without an Attracting Setting is Often Very Gray……and Very, Very Cold

Temperature doesn’t measure the arrival of Winter in Minnesota.   Our landscapes usually do.

If one bothers to look,  Winter in Minnesota is equal to Spring and Fall in the quality of its beauty  offered by sight.   Outdoor viewing during and immediately after snowfall creates a landscape garden aura of its own…..if there is a landscape garden in site, that is.

And, let us thank God, this garden “aura” doesn’t occur in summer as it has in mid May and late  September upon occasion in my own life time.  It might otherwise make winter living unbearable in our Northland.

The setting below was photographed during a late  autumn hoar frost and light snow fall a few years ago  at our Masterpiece Farms near Maple Lake, a bit northwest of Minnesota’s Twin Cities.   I grant the photo is not an inspiring and incredible beauty to advertise as a landscape garden if color was its primary measure.   Winter in Minnesota is six months long folks….equal in length to all other landscape seasons combined.

Imagine what this photo, and therefore the setting, would look like without the planted plant material.    There it is in the background, a background unattractive and uniform  enough to  make viewers focus on the textures, forms, and “colors” of the garden plants and the positioned boulder in the foreground.

When you first spied the photograph, what captured your eye first?????

We know, for most viewers,  it was  the boulder…..Why?   At immediate glance the eye quickly  picks up the full setting more or less without noticing form, that is true….but only for an instant….There is  no color to attract ones searching eyes, folks.   No yellows or whites surrounded by masses of green to grab your mind.

Moreover there are a couple of Nature’s arrows pointing to the boulder….White, frosty  ones according to my eyes.   Without a doubt the darkness  and texture of the Arborvitae foliage corners the boulder pronouncing its existence to capture your eye.

Will anyone want to sit there?   Perhaps….but for the landscape garden uninitiated, probably not, unless there is a spectacular scene to the right, somewhere in its  horizon, if one does.

Landscape Gardening is ideally  an Art form based upon soul, knowledge of plants, space, texture, and form, even fragrance….  Tricks of the Trade, ideally,  an art form when at its best, is designed to impress and then capture  the human eye to inspire the human soul.

 

 

Without Decay, There Is No Life…Especially in the Landscaped Garden

Filed under: shrubs and trees,The Art of Landscaping — glenn @ 5:47 pm

Dear Minnesota  Homeowner….It’s late October in the Twin Cities.   What are you planning to do with all of those falling leaves now swirling around your grounds?

Most likely you’ll do what you’ve done as long as you have lived in your Twin City house…either rake the leaves up,  or  very loudly power blow them into a pile, bag them up and have them  driven  someplace  to make them disappear.

I have lived on my Twin City  western suburban property at the western dead end of a one block  cul de sac  for over forty years.   I am not aware of a single bag of leaves ever leaving my property.   On the contrary, I gather about 50 bags of leaves from friends for a variety of uses throughout my 27,000 square foot landscape garden.  (I grow only  about 160 square feet of mowed lawn.)

For my uses, I prefer most of the leaves to be chopped up for they decay into compost much more quickly.   Not all leaves are equal, however.

Chopped oak leaves are my favorite residue leaf for landscape garden use.    Unchopped oak leaves are my favorite among the unchopped regardless of the genus. Fallen oak leaves remain crisp throughout the winter.   They entrap ‘closets’ of air created by their crisp and often slightly curled leaves creating layers of insulation around roots and crown of their harboring  plants providing ‘blankets’ of protection from  severe temperatures during Winter.

Many oaks, especially those of  white oak heritage, usually  hold their leaves throughout winter….often artistically  a positive providing  form to our usually  formless urban winter “flatscapes”  in and around the Twin Cities.

Sugar and Norway Maple leaves are not crisp, do not provide pockets of warmth, but stick tightly  together as if glued by slime thereby forbidding aeration to keep stems and roots of many plants  healthy.   These leaves are particularly useful, however, in killing lawns or other  non woody vegetation.   They are useful, therefore,  when piled as mulch to kill grasses, weedy non-woody greenery to open areas of ones ground as prelude to plantings  of more beautiful, more  inspiring,  and/or  useful landscape garden plantings.

For an example:  Garden phlox can become a very dominating flowering perennial, that is weedy as some folks might say, in open ground seedable garden territories.   I cherish them.    These garden phlox seedlings can spread their seedlings in all sorts of directions of open ground territory in one gardened season.   I, my landscape garden’s sole artist,  then decide which flowering phlox I like best and cull the rest.

If Minnesotans  never raked their lawns or flower beds  amid Norway and/or Sugar Maple trees, in a couple of years  there wouldn’t be much left of any desirable  understory plantings, especially lawn grass.   If you become tired mowing that part of your grounds, you may welcome a visual change toward the more  beautiful.

I prefer conifers as the major tree features of my grounds.   Most Minnesotans forget that  Winter is Minnesota’s longest landscape season, equal to all other seasons combined.    Winter home  grounds are nearly universally  ghastly bleak  without these majestic EVERGREEN  wonders.

In Spring of 1976 I bought ten second-year old seedlings of  White Pine,  Pinus strobus, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of our then democratic nation.   They amounted to  nine inches in length (height)  per tree when planted.    In this, their 40th year,  seven are left….Two are already 100 feet tall, four others in their fifties, and one rather a runt.    Three died  within the first three years of the plantings.

To endure our northern winters, White Pines do drop old needles  in fall as do all  coniferous trees.    They, too, are useful as a mulch, but better used  for appearance than for weed control and decay.

Try   never to  mulch with plastics or other lifeless  matter including stone chips, especially limestone unless necessary for some particular scene you, the artist, want to create.     Boulders, as long as they are not lined up and the same size, can become  neighborhood garden beauties as well as seating  areas and climbing spots  if well positioned.

HINTS:  Artistically, it is better to bag, or otherwise group your tree leaves  separately by species and without scrap foliage when placing them upon the grounds you want to clear.  “Neatify” you work.    Where ever you spread them, and if you spread the mulch thickly enough, these groupings will look more like carpets throughout the winter and the following growing season, than a  dump for garbage.

Decaying plant  material, otherwise known as ‘organic matter’  in this case autumn leaves,  requires certain nutrients for the decaying process itself.  By piling them a foot or  more   heat increases over a period of time hastening  the decaying process which releases nutrients for ‘locals’ to absorb.   Regular, reliable watering hastens the compost making process.

According to the landscape industry’s advertising declarations, the expected height for the  Sunkist, (or Yellow Ribbon) Arborvitae is advertised as six to eight feet.   I planted one about twenty years ago in my front side landscape.   It is thirty feet tall.   Two doors down the block, I planted one in a neighbor’s front grounds about twelve years ago.   It is only six feet tall….but all the same, very attractive. The difference is in the soil, fertilizing and regular watering.

 

October 23, 2016

The Art of Landscape Gardening #1

Beauty as a value in our western culture began its death throes from the unspeakable horror of the industrialized slaughter of countless millions of  World War I.   It stands to reason its disappearing  accelerated into oblivion with the slaughters which followed….World War II, and the estimated 20,000,000 in the USSR murdered by Joseph Stalin and the 60,000,000 killed by Mao Tse Dung to rearrange China into  police states.

Music is an aural experience to human kind, inspiring the soul via the ear.   What one visualizes as a work of art is, of course, sensitive to the human eye.   Can beauty exist without soul?

What ‘music’ have you heard  profoundly  beautiful to the ear has been composed  within the past ninety years?

Likewise, what have you seen recently or since the First World War settings created which are  profoundly beautiful in any of the visual arts created by anyone?

To socialists who are now politically  conquering our America with things government, “beauty”  must disappear, for if something is deemed beautiful,  other things are deemed  not as beautiful, therefore causing bad feelings and despair among some folks.

Beethoven  became   dead to the ear and therefore the brain in our American culture  years ago.  With his and similar inspiring music, what is left to hear?

Noise and vulgarity!  Both  now fill our American ears and have so for more than a half century.

Landscape gardening is the most favored among all of the arts including the musical.   Among nearly all  classical religions, especially JudeoChristianity,  paradise is perfection existing in a beautiful garden.  No other art form reaches such  height and honor.   It’s understandable, for so much of the Earth when  in its order is so beautiful to view.

The landscape garden shown in the photo below is a setting in the back yard of a 45 by 90 foot property in crowded Dinky town, Minneapolis featuring the owner’s garage.  How does your landscape grow?   Are you inspired every moment you enter  and walk  through your gardened grounds?   What causes beauty?

It arises from the imagination nested in the human mind.   The best in the art of landscape gardening it is created by TRICKS OF THE TRADE as seen by the eye pursuing some kind of order.

However in today’s  practice,  nearly all  human made grounds visible to urban and town folks are quite ugly.   Make a list of the most important words you think are needed to whet your mind to generate  creating  a beautiful landscape garden.

I think it fair to claim that we, at Masterpiece, created this piece of gardened  grounds many years ago.  It is also fair to claim that the homeowner of these grounds studied so carefully  over its many years of our assistance, she became so inspired by it,  she  learned the tricks of the trade to make  it her own Masterpiece.

Landscape gardening is a visual art form.   Let us assume there is a beauty to the landscape garden shown below.  What tricks of the trade have enticed you to want to enter these grounds?   Learning the vocabulary is the first trick.    Call us at Masterpiece when you need assistance.

 

September 20, 2016

How Beautiful is the Drive to Your Garage?

BEAUTY AND YOUR GARAGE

So, you’re driving home from work.   Traffic is miserable.  Every day traffic seems to become more consuming of  the world in which  you  live.   Home…..to home,  paradise at last?

What would paradise be….a bath?….a nap?…..playing with ones kids?…..supper?……a beautiful family  living in a beautiful setting,  all of these pleasures at their proper time?

We at Masterpiece Landscaping are in the beautiful-setting business for homes and businesses.   The following drive to home and its garage was designed to inspire the eye and therefore the mind the moment one turns from the public streets of noise and danger.

Peace, peace at last….  color, fragrance, light, temperature, forms, memories, Mother Earth,  replace the time and tension and the angst of driving home.

Home, home at last for the  folks living  in the St. Paul garden picture below, who have worked with us at Masterpiece over the past several years.

 

 

Ideally, the  landscape gardening is supposed to be, according to history whether East or West, the most favored art form known to mankind, an art for  the eye and mind what Beethovens’ adagios are for the ear and soul.

Eternal Paradise according to nearly every major religion of history is  a Landscape Garden, not a symphony or opera, no matter how beautiful and inspirational its music, however.   It is life ALIVE for the pleasure of the thinking  animal to feel closest to God while on Earth.

For several generations,  causing beauty has  disappeared from the American   mind and soul.   Causing beauty for the eye and ear are TRICKS OF A TRADE,  tricks no longer professed at school and university, where we are programmed to believe beauty is dangerous.   If something is deemed beautiful automatically deems something less beautiful, therefore causing jealousy in the world.

For those of you interested in creating or  restoring beauty to your home or business grounds, call us at 952-933-5777!

 

 

 

 

 

September 12, 2016

THE BEGINNING OF THE FALL

We human animals  spend much our life “avoiding”  falls.

This is particularly true when the coming “fall”  happens to be your 82nd birthday.  Yet, without it I’d be already dead.  (Oh, the irony of Life!)   And without that fall there’d be no blessed Spring.

Fall, that is the autumn one in our Minnesota , is a very short Fall, often barely over a month long  with every day the prospect of  colder, much colder temperatures with darker days, and therefore the end of Spring and Summer.

Most “Minnesotans”,  Europeans and others, since the disappearance of a thousand feet of our glacial ice over us  a few  thousands of years ago, spent  most of their days working  outdoors to survive.  Prosperity’s cultural influence have sent these animals indoors, however, and have done so locally overwhelmingly   IN MY LIFETIME.

In today’s newer homes and huge residential housing structures one measures the quality of   life  by avoiding the outdoors completely by ‘driving’ from kitchen to workplace without ever leaving a heated conveyance to avoid their enemy,  their outdoors.

Fewer and fewer people in the general population have to be “bothered” about the look, the feel, the being of the outdoors, the grounds around the abode where they live.   Fewer and fewer people understand the world of the plants around them and the  “Gardens of Eden”   their religions used to worship as the highest, most perfect, most beautiful  environment of  thinking animal life.  (It also happens to be where our food and water come whether today’s human animal is aware of it or not.)

Winter in Minnesota is this part of the world’s longest landscape season of each year.   It happens to be nearly as long as all other landscape seasons, Spring, Summer, and Fall, combined…..mid-October to mid-April…..and in my youth, even  through the end of April into May.

In that youth city and town homeowners, nearly none of them wealthy in those days, most paying taxes on 45′ by 90′ foot  properties, did their very best to maintain their lawns, foundation plantings, vegetable gardens and flower beds despite the city’s  elm tree on their boulevard grass and  the habitual silver maple tree in the middle of the front yard, the cheapest tree buy available, whether needed or not.   Beyond the beauty of the rise of each Spring with the rebirth of its flowers and foliage, almost all of  the landscape  was “artless”….but it was usually  well maintained and kept neat.

Tulips, hyacinths, daffodils,  lilacs, bleeding hearts, marigolds, four 0’clocks,  rhubarb, carrots, lettuce,  and tomatoes were the order of the day.   Pfitzer junipers covered cement blocks at the foundations  of older houses.

Outdoors is where city and town folk  used to meet, chat, and share……..at a time when so little was available to beautify so much to meet the standards of that day.   Most homeowners could recognized a pine from a spruce, a conifer from an evergreen.    Fortunately,  most folks  couldn’t afford the non-living  junk that is sold at  garden markets these days.   The landscape was supposed to be welcoming to owner, neighbor,  and visitor alike.

In the ideal landscape gardening is supposed to be an art form…..the most cherished in nearly all human society.  “One is closest to God in the Garden” is a universal cliche.  WINTER IS AS BEAUTIFUL A SEASON AS ANY OTHER SEASON OF THE YEAR!

Fall, however, is an excellent time to examine ones home and/or business grounds.  Have such grounds been made beautiful for the coming fall of the leaves and temperatures?   What remains in your home or business landscape  grounds that is beautiful to behold?

THERE ARE MANY ROADS TO BEAUTY, FOLKS.   Winter is as Beautiful as any other Season!     Call us at  952-933-5777….Give us a chance to prove the Truth of this Truth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 31, 2016

When Color Conquers the Landscape Garden

BUTCHART GARDENS // VANCOUVER ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA

 

Color in the well developed landscape garden usually conquers all other senses and moods possessed by the human visitor.  It is the most enticing lure collecting visitors.  Spring is usually the season when the   most spectacular  of color shows occur.   The foliage is fresh in color and texture especially in our Minnesota location.

It is obvious to us northern landscape gardeners the beautiful colorful display  below did not occur in our climate zone.    We in the North do not have anywhere near the broad pallet from which to choose our  colors  and the shapes and sizes of plants carrying such colors.   Nevertheless, such a beautiful landscape garden as you view below can be, and is  managed in our communities, but with fewer varieties  of perennial  plants and the length of time their spectacular colors can be displayed.

The growing season is very, very short in our Twin City area compared to Vancouver Island.   The island, if I can remember by geography correctly, is North of our metropolitan community.   It’s the moisture and the lack of  our Minnesota winter there which guarantees a far greater number of beautiful flowering perennial plants from which to choose when planting.

From this view of this garden setting, to what planting, most likely, will your eye be lured  to view first?

The human male has many varieties of colorblindness which may interfere with the generalization to be written here.  It is likely that  the majority of  first viewers of this setting, their colorblindness tendencies notwithstanding, will be captured by the size and shape of the  colorful tree in the center and then move immediately to the right where white floral ground covers are central amidst  a large setting of many colors of several shapes and sizes.   White, yellow, chartreuse, orange lead the list in an order of colors commanding first human glance in the garden, with all things being equally ‘lit’.     Even in the light shade below, white dominates the first glance which quickly moves on to community of colors  surrounding it.     Some folks will be tagged at the light lavender to the back ground right, yet other eyes might be captured by the brilliantly colored lawn leading the red on the left  before returning to dwell on the beauty of the  FORM of the tree central to the picture.

Viewers should remember that floral color on perennials, both herbaceous and woody, is almost always brief.   In our Minnesota a week to three weeks at the most is common.

In our Minnesota, winter is the  longest landscape garden season of the year, as long as all other seasons combined….This truth, this reality seems to be totally unknown to government, home owners, most citizens by the winter displays of ‘gardened’ grounds. “Beauty  in the Minnesota winter landscape garden” is a rare sight except for grounds created by Masterpiece Landscaping.

How would you grade the beauty quotient of winter settings of  the home grounds in your neighborhood?

Call us at Masterpiece,  612-933-5777 for assistance if your ‘settings’ are starved of the beautiful.

 

August 30, 2016

Not all Beauties in the Landscape Garden World are Equal

Filed under: The Art of Landscaping — glenn @ 11:32 pm

 STOURHEAD // WILTSHIRE, ENGLAND

 

“Beauty” is a word which has disappeared from today’s American vocabulary.
For centuries in our “English” cultural past,  the adage, “ONE IS CLOSEST TO GOD WHEN IN THE GARDEN”,  was taken for granted as nearly a universal truth.   Paradise was God-centered where   perfection, goodness, peace,   reigned in God’s Beauty  on Earth,  a gardened landscape named Eden in the JudeoChristian tradition.
Modernity has put an end to such dreams.  Inspiration caused by  God-fearing man creating  beauty for the eye and ear to uplift the  human soul has been replaced by the Godless, the human   male and female, to be made mere  animals equal in the perverse, the mundane, the animal without soul mired in ignorance and jealousy.
In a ten year period of the 1990s, I spent nearly a year of my life visiting this  Stourhead of Wiltshire, England, as well as forty, maybe fifty or more Landscape Gardens of that beautiful  land,  other grounds of equal exquisite landscape garden beauty.
What is Beauty?   What is in the power of Beauty that so inspires viewers?
What is in  the power of musical Beauty that causes our breath to turn into tears when overloaded by its power?    (Do listen to Richard Strauss’ opening  3 minutes of    “Also Sprach Zarathustra”, or  attend the first half hour and the very end of the  movie, “2001 Space Odyssey” for similar ‘audio punishment’ from Beauty to the ear.)    Test yourself.
Beauty in music has arisen through  the human male mind  from the Natures grunts and  explosions, winds, and seas, calls and eventually melodies.   May we  forever bless Beethoven and his predecessors through the ages   for their  cravings to  package such gifts of great Beauty  caused by creating noise to INSPIRE!
Our “MOTHER” Earth is endlessly   offering the human eye with daily  Beauty, despite the hubbub of modern life, its industry, its roads, its speed of travel and time.   She sends us Beauty lessons everywhere if  humankind would look…..overwhelmingly   without a human touch beyond ‘preservation’.
It’s impossible  for the human animal to landscape garden something  measuring up to the Beauty of the Grand Canyon.   We remain small animals on this huge Earth….But this animal can, and has for centuries,   created landscape gardens of equal Beauty, because they ARE man made, designed, installed, maintained to gain and maintain Beauty to inspire all who enter its Garden’s gates.
Never forget that other adage the landscape gardened interested must memorize….”Landscape gardens, like people, gain character with age.”
Now, your lesson of our day…..Put into writing using accurate sentences…..from the photo of Stourhead above, WHY IS IT SO BEAUTIFUL?      What  tricks of the landscape gardeners’ trade  were employed to achieve such harmony?    Why were they done so?
And then, don’t forget to answer, what tricks of the photographers’ trade were used to assure this photo of this view of the Stourhead  grounds would be beautiful…..in order to inspire the viewer?
(Special thanks goes to client B.R. for sending the above photo!)
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